Today's Hours
Museum: 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Gardens: 7:00 AM - 5:30 PM
Today's Hours
Museum: 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Gardens: 7:00 AM - 5:30 PM
Summer
Like influential 19th century female artists Mary Cassatt and Cecilia Beaux, Camelia Whitehurst focused on the aspects of life that she knew best and found her favorite subject in children, particularly young girls, whom she depicted in the impressionistic style of her mentors. Her high-key colors and broken brushwork are here used to depict the dappled light of the leaves and the shifting patterns of shadow and sun on the little girl with the apples gathered from the orchard behind her. Like most American Impressionists, her subject matter was inherently conservative, depicting the picturesque side of life among the privileged classes. Born in Baltimore to well-to-do parents, Whitehurst studied under Beaux, as well as William Merritt Chase, another influential American Impressionist, at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts. Afterward, she moved to France to study, opening a studio in Paris and traveling throughout Europe. Returning to Baltimore permanently, she received honorable mention at the National Association of Women Painters and Sculptors in 1921, and the following year a review of her work in The New York Times declared: Camelia Whitehurst is brilliant and fluent as usual . . .