Today's Hours
Museum: 10:00 AM - 7:00 PM
Gardens: 7:00 AM - 5:30 PM
Today's Hours
Museum: 10:00 AM - 7:00 PM
Gardens: 7:00 AM - 5:30 PM
Interior of a Church with Coffered Dome
Interior of a Church
From the Renaissance through the Enlightenment, many painters and sculpters were also architects. Such was the case of Giuseppe Barberi, a Neo-Classical artist of the 18th century, who, like his father, also named Giuseppe Barberi (1682 1767), created sketches and designs for a number of Italian temples and buildings in addition to creating other art objects. This drawing, utilizing black chalk, pen and brown ink, and a grey and brown wash, illustrates a Baroque style of church architecture. Popularized by architects/artists like Gianlorenzo Bernini and Francesco Borromini, these Baroque churches and cathedrals blended classical design derived from the Roman architecture (exemplified by the designs of Michelangelo and Donato Bramante) with the more intricate decorative flourishes of the Baroque (like the coffered ceiling and incised arches) and a larger scale. Though Barberi lived during the Neo-Classical period, which more typically simplified both art and architecture to reflect the cleaner lines of Greek architecture and certain Palladian architecture, he was a proponent of the Rococo, or Late Baroque movement which favored more decorative flourishes. The Museo di Roma owns the largest holdings of Barberis works, including drawings like this, some for buildings completed, some for buildings he only imagined.