Today's Hours
Museum: 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Gardens: 7:00 AM - 5:30 PM
Today's Hours
Museum: 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Gardens: 7:00 AM - 5:30 PM
Jean
Jean, front
Jean, side
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Jean has a Simon & Halberg bisque head with brown hair and blue eyes. She is wearing a black satin jacket with embroidery that is a scale replica of an original of the period that was donated to Gray and Blumenstiel for the collection. With it she wears a salmon velvet asymmetrically tiered skirt and a green felt hat with a salmon colored veil and ostrich feathers. She also carried a reticule that matches her jacket. This was the period of the famous "Gibson Girl", made popular through the advertisement drawing of Charles Gibson, who maintained the heavy bust line of the turn-of-the-century, but added a looser, swirling skirt. Some scholars suggest that the Gibson Girl, the first popular media image of the female, set the first national standard for feminine beauty. While she maintained the popular s-curve created by corset, the Gibson Girl also became the first image to popularize women in action as Charles Gibson depicted her in bathing costume, playing tennis, and attending college, among other activities.



Jean Gordon (1865 - 1932)



Jean and her sister Kate Gordon (1861-1932) were significant social reformers and suffragists. Focusing her life on social service, Jean worked to help get the Child Labor Act of 1906 passed. A clause in the act allowed women to become factory inspectors and she was the first woman to hold that position. Her concern for the plight of children and the mentally challenged led her to become president of the Milne Asylum for Destitute Orphan Girls, where she established a model home-school for the care and vocational education of the mentally handicapped. She also helped establish daycare for working mothers and directed the Louisiana State Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals.



Her sister Kate is better-known as a suffragist. In 1896 she founded the ERA Club to work for Womens suffrage. She spoke at the National American Woman Suffrage Association convention in 1900, led the Louisiana state suffrage association from 1904-1913, and influenced the Democratic National Convention of 1916 to endorse suffrage on their platform.