Today's Hours
Museum: Closed
Gardens: 7:00 AM - 5:30 PM
Today's Hours
Museum: Closed
Gardens: 7:00 AM - 5:30 PM
Forest Scene
Forest Scene
Though he is usually considered the greatest Dutch landscape painter after his friend and colleague Jacob van Ruisdael, the facts of Meyndert Hobbemas life remain somewhat obscure and contradictory. Though he was apparently baptized Oct. 31, 1638, some of the works attributed to him are dated as early as 1650. We do know he was married in 1668, with Jacob van Ruisdael as a witness. As a master of detail, Hobbemas subtle treatment of light and tonality provide a surprising richness to seemingly prosaic forest scenes like this one. Along with Van Ruisdael, he is considered the final and greatest development of Dutch landscape art. His works are moderately toned, usually in an olive key with touches of grey and russet, yet display a variety of leafage and astonishing finish of detail and subtlety of light shining through the leaves. Though posterity has recognized his gifts, Hobbema endured his last decades in poverty. In 1704 his wife was buried in the paupers section of Westerkerk Cemetary in Amsterdam and he followed her there five years later. Ironically, several of the great Dutch artists of the period, including Rembrandt, Hals, Van Ruisdael, and Hobbema all died destitute.