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Museum: 1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Gardens: 7:00 AM - 5:30 PM
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Collection Item
Maurice Kingsley wrote an article called "El Cinco de Mayo" for the May 7, 1892 issue of Harper's Weekly and Remington provided 4 illustrations, including this one. While El Cinco de Mayo, or May 5, is not Mexican Independence Day, it is frequently treated as though it were. Mexico actually declared its independence from Spain on September 15, 1810; May 5th celebrates the end of another battle for independence. Early in 1862 French troops landed in Mexico, supposedly to collect debts owed by the government of President Benito Juarez. Emperor Napoleon III used the opportunity to put a Hapsburg prince,...
Created by: Remington, Frederic
Collection Item
Early in 1893, Remington and his friend John Howard visited the hacienda San Jose de Bavicora, a 900,000 acre cattle ranch just northwest of Chihuahua, Mexico. At that time, the hacienda was owned by Jack Gilbert, whose long struggle with the Apaches in building his land empire was chronicled by Remington in 3 illustrated articles for Harper's Monthly running from December, 1893 to March, 1894. Mexican Cowboys Coming to the Rodeo was an illustration for the last article, "A Rodeo at Los Ojos." Remington described the scene, "My imagination had never pictured before anything so wild as these leather-clad...
Created by: Remington, Frederic
Collection Item
Russell was an established professional artist in February of 1906 when Casper Whitney, editor of Outing Magazine, commissioned him to go to Mexico to capture the image of the Mexican cowpuncher. Arrangements were made for him to stay at the hacienda of Don Luis Terrazas, owner of the largest ranch in the world, requiring 1,000 vaqueros to manage its cattle, horses, and mules. Russell witnessed them brand 75,000 calves that spring and painted numerous scenes of the vaqueros in action, like this lively scene of the roping of a longhorn. So pleased was Don Luis that he was instrumental in...
Created by: Russell, Charles M.
Collection Item
Micaela has a J.D. Kester bisque head with black hair and brown eyes. She wears a red velvet walking dress with a deep black lace bertha joined by three jeweled buttons. This dress continued the hourglass look that had become popular in the late 1830s. In 1837, Queen Victoria came to the throne and fashion became much more rigid in terms of what was permitted, if not in terms of using common sense. The queen did take one step in the right direction when her bootmaker created a low boot with elastic insets at the side for her; these became known as gaiters and were an important...
Created by: Gray, Ruth Lewelling
Manufactured by: Armand Marseilles
Collection Item
8 inches long
Created by: Atkins, Lloyd
Collection Item
7 inches high
Created by: Atkins, Lloyd
Collection Item
Minnie has an Armand Marseille bisque head with brown hair and brown eyes. She is wearing a turquoise taffeta dress trimmed with yellow embroidered lace. The dress has a shirred yoke and three-quarter puffed sleeves. To complete her outfit, she wears brown satin slippers. Lace remained popular during this period, but some people, particularly those too poor for the finer hand-made laces, created a vogue for Irish crochet lace, similar to that we see on Minnie. The second great wave of Irish immigration was taking place during this period, symbolized by Annie Moore, who at age 14, became the first...
Created by: Gray, Ruth Lewelling
Manufactured by: Armand Marseilles
Collection Item
Weight 8 1/2 ozs.
Created by: Russell, Charles M.
Collection Item
Weight 1 lb., 11 ozs. Cast 7/9
Created by: Russell, Charles M.
Collection Item
Weight 2 lbs., 2 ozs. Cast 7/9
Created by: Russell, Charles M.
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