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Today's Hours
Museum: Closed
Gardens: 7:00 AM - 5:30 PM
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While the French Barbizons and Impressionists received most of the attention given to landscapes in the 19th century, there was a long tradition of landscape painting in the Low Countries, stemming from the 17th century Golden Age that boasted Dutch Old Masters like Jacob van Ruisdael and Jan van Goyen. A fellow Dutchman, Frederik Marinus Kruseman was born in Haarlem in the Netherlands. As a young man, he studied with Van Ravenswaay, Koekkoek, Reeks, and Roosenboom, seeking to emulate the 17th century masters. While artists like Van Ruisdael had died poor, Kruseman lived in a time when middle-class households could...
Created by: Kruseman, Fredrik M.
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If history and religious paintings continued to dominate the Academies and Salons of Europe, the most popular artistic genre for the rising middle class was the landscape. One didnt need a university education or centuries worth of art history hanging in the manors gallery to appreciate the beauty of the outdoors made available to hang on the apartment walls of London, Edinburgh, and Paris. This art stressed picturesque rural scenes of homely images, such as old mossy-orchards and ancient, twisted oaks with tangled hedges and decaying cottages. In short, the life theyd left behind with their grandparents. The son of...
Created by: Nasmyth, Patrick
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Weight 4 lbs., 2 ozs. Cast 1/12
Created by: Russell, Charles M.
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A sentimental favorite among Civil War buffs, this scene has been depicted by a number of artists. The most famous version is also most likely the earliest: The Last Meeting of Lee and Jackson, painted by Everett B.D. Julio (1843-1879) in 1869. The meeting took place on the morning of May 2, 1863 shortly before the Battle of Chancellorsville. Returning to his own lines after the battle, Jackson was accidentally shot by one of his own pickets. Jackson's left arm had to be amputated, and he was then moved to Thomas C. Chandlers plantation, Fairfield, for recovery. Lee sent him...
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In 1880, when Russell first arrived in Montana, one observer estimated a herd of buffalo in the Judith Basin at 100,000 animals. The same observer, James Willard Schultz, also described a ritual particular to the mating season: "Now and then a herd in this mating season would come down off the plain in a swift run, plunge into the river, cross it, and wander up on the plain on the other side." Such is the scene Russell depicts here, one he was privileged to witness personally. But he barely made it. After the great hunts of 1881-82, the great herds...
Created by: Russell, Charles M.
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Auguste Bonheur, though he often painted domestic animals, preferred to work at landscapes. Seeking beautiful vistas, he became a seasoned traveler; as scholar Lydia Harambourg said of him, "He likes the steep and mountainous sites of the Auvergne and returns often to paint in the Cantal. Under the influence of his sister Rosa, his landscapes are enlivened with herds. He also works in the forest of Fontainebleau, Brittany, the Pyrenees, on the banks of the Rhine, and in Scotland." His work was often exhibited at the Paris Salon, winning medals in 1852, 1859, and 1861. He was named a Chevalier...
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Dakota, Minnehaha, North American Indian Series. Hand-painted porcelain.
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Manufactured by: Cybis Porcelain
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Though she herself grew up in an apartment in the heart of Paris, Rosa Bonheur became one of the leading chroniclers of the labor of the rural worker, while avoiding the appearance of supporting dangerous political sympathies for the peasant class. At the Exposition Universelle of 1855, she won a gold medal for La Fenaison en Auvergne, or Haymaking in the Auvergne; critic Anatole de LaForge wrote that her entire oeuvre could be called Hymn to Work. Some of her reverence for the working class doubtless stemmed from her fathers involvement with the socialist movement, though Rosa herself remained politically...
Created by: Bonheur, Rosa
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Automatic. Blue; fully engraved. Checkered wood grips. 33 oz. 8-shot mag.
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Though inspired by the Barbizon painters and a particular pet of Corot's, the young Rosa Bonheur hedged her bets by blending an Academic finish with the working class/domestic animal focus of the Barbizons to create a popular middle-of-the-road style known as the juste milieu. While more politically-oriented artists like Jean-Francois Millet came under fire for the supposedly socialist sentiments expressed in their paintings of the working class, juste milieu artists were able to escape the opprobrium of conservative critics. Though personally radical, Rosa remained professionally centrist and, as a result, at a time when Realist artists like Courbet were under...
Created by: Bonheur, Rosa
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