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Museum: 1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Gardens: 7:00 AM - 5:30 PM
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All Items (Szmyd, Edward)
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Though Szymd often traveled to find subjects, as in this depiction of the popular resort town in Mexico, he preferred not to work in plein air, producing most of his work in a studio environment. As he explained, "I prefer not working on location. The light changes so quickly and there are the problems of the elements. After going on a research trip for a special subject, I usually come back with enough reference to keep me busy for a year. I choose a subject, photograph it, and proceed to paint it as idyllically as possible. Once the painting is...
Created by: Szmyd, Edward
Collection Item
Like many still-life artists, Szymd was drawn to red poppies because of their vibrant color and velvety texture. Though his subject may seem simple, his work method was not. As Szymd explained, "The work is time consuming and many months may pass before I am sufficiently satisfied to release a particular painting. Under the final paint surface are many stages of development. Each painting represents a different problem. The painting is signed when all the problems are solved and there is nothing more I can do . . . to improve the work."
Created by: Szmyd, Edward
Collection Item
That there are several paintings of red poppies by various artists in the Norton is due to the influence of a single man Claude Monet. Monets masterpieces often featured this striking bloom and any artist who specializes in painting living blossoms sooner or later comes to their bright beauty. Edward Szymd made a lifetime specialty of flowers and still-lifes, relying on his own cherished and cultivated gardens for inspiration, much as Monet did at Giverny. Unlike Monet, who painted wild poppies en plein air in his impressionistic style, Szymd, who preferred to work in his studio, presents us with...
Created by: Szmyd, Edward
Collection Item
Though he specialized in gardens and floral still-lifes, Edward Szymd often traveled to explore other vistas for his art, for instance, painting a rough wintry seascape for a friend based on a trip he made to Maine. On a trip to Tennessee in the 1960s, he passed through Blowing Rock, North Carolina and was enchanted by the area. He returned repeatedly, finally settling there permanently in 1985. His national reputation continued to grow as he added mountain scenery and wintry landscapes inspired by his new home, like that depicted in "The Sentinel."
Created by: Szmyd, Edward
Collection Item
As he began to find success with fine art, Edward Szymd purchased a home in Dania, Florida which he christened Orchid House, surrounding it with lush gardens, including a variety of orchids. In painting the sun-drenched landscapes and individual flowers and blooms he drew from that inspiration, he established himself as a master of both light and color in a traditionally realistic style. However, there was a downside. Szymd explained, "Florida's climate lends itself to growing orchids. I found myself with a collection of 4,000 plants which I maintained personally. This started to interfere with my career as an artist...
Created by: Szmyd, Edward
Collection Item
Born June 9, 1933 in Trafford, Pennsylvania, Edward Szymd once declared, "I started painting at the age of 9." After graduating from the Art Institute in Pittsburgh, he moved to Florida in 1950 and began a career as a commercial artist. He painted landscapes and still-lifes on the side, selling them along Las Olas Boulevard in Fort Lauderdale until he had accumulated enough of a following to devote himself to art full time. In addition to his obvious love of flowers, Szymds artistic influences are evident in works like "Sunflowers," which echoes the light, color, and textual qualities of the...
Created by: Szmyd, Edward
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