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Museum: 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Gardens: 7:00 AM - 5:30 PM
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All Items (Remington, Frederic) (Paintings)
Collection Item
Originally planned as an illustration for "General Crook in the Indian Country", an article by Captain John G. Bourke for the March 1891 Century Magazine, this was the first Remington painting to be shown in the annual spring exhibition of the National Academy of Design, marking a sort of official acceptance of Remington by the artistic establishment. It has become one of Remington's best-known pieces and may seem strangely familiar to many viewers. When renowned director John Ford made his 1949 movie, She Wore a Yellow Ribbon, starring John Wayne, he used several of Remington's paintings and sculptures as the...
Created by: Remington, Frederic
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The sense of furious action and kinetic tension exhibited in this work are similar to what Remington would soon be bringing to his sculptural pieces. The subject is a young acquaintance of Remington's who was making his own acquaintance with a spirited Western bronco. Born in Brooklyn, New York, Graham F. Blandy went West as a young man, where he became the subject of this portrait of a "greenhorn" cowboy sometime between 1890 and 1900. Soon after, Blandy returned to the East, making his fortune as a prominent New York stockbroker and acquiring a large estate called "The Tuleyries" in...
Created by: Remington, Frederic
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Having achieved notable success and the financial security that attended it, in 1899 Remington bought a small island on the St. Lawrence River near Ogdensburg, New York in order to build a summer home. He remodeled a small cottage on the island, naming it Ingleneuk, and spent time there painting, writing, and enjoying favorite sports like canoeing, fishing, and swimming. By this time, he had also become friendly with leading American Impressionist Childe Hassam and was searching for new directions in his own art. Aware that critics sometimes faulted his handling of color, he decided to start his new approach...
Created by: Remington, Frederic
Collection Item
Remington made frequent trips to both Mexico and Canada. In this instance, he had traveled to Mexico to gather research for illustrations in an article on the Mexican army by Thomas Janvier. Always fascinated by military uniforms, he prided himself on careful observation and meticulous accuracy in his depiction of them, a pride that sometimes led to uncomfortable altercations with other artists, like the one he initiated with rival Charles Schreyvogel over the latter's portrayal of Custer. Occasioning no such conflict, this Mexican trooper was one of Remingtons early pieces, appearing in the November, 1889 issue of Harper's Monthly.
Created by: Remington, Frederic
Collection Item
In September 1893, Remington first met the man who would become his most famous collaborator, author Owen Wister. The two planned to work together on 8 or 9 illustrated stories for Harper's Monthly and Harpers Weekly. The son of a wealthy Philadelphia physician and grandson of fabled actress Fanny Kemble, Wister attended schools in Britain and Switzerland before attending Harvard where he was a classmate of Theodore Roosevelt. After trying several careers, Wister, who like Roosevelt was fascinated with the West, decided to try writing about life on the frontier. This story was about Corporal Specimen Jones who is called upon to keep peace in Boise, Idaho when...
Created by: Remington, Frederic
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In the late 19th century, Americas most famous poet was undoubtedly Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. Of all his poems, arguably the most popular was his epic tale of an Ojibwa hero, The Song of Hiawatha. Originally published in 1855, the book was an immediate and sustained best-seller and in 1888 Houghton Mifflin decided to publish a new edition with illustrations. Not yet 30, the young Remington received what was to be his first important commission - 22 paintings and nearly 400 text drawings to accompany the text. The illustrated editions publication in 1891 made his name a household word. This grisaille...
Created by: Remington, Frederic
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Painted as one of the illustrations for the 1891 edition of Longfellows The Song of Hiawatha, this painting was done in grisaille to better accommodate its transfer to a printing medium in black and white. Grisaille is a painting technique that uses only gray tones. Originally designed for illustrations of sculpture, or simply to show off the virtuosity of painters (since color can help disguise deficiencies of draftsmanship and composition), it became popular in the 18th and 19th centuries because it eased the transition from paint to print. This particular paintings depicts a scene that takes place after Hiawathas brother...
Created by: Remington, Frederic
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Remington produced a number of paintings whose subject was the hunting of grizzly bears. This particular work was originally featured in the September 7, 1901 issue of Collier's Weekly and later included in Remington's book, Done in the Open. In the book, it was re-titled At Last and accompanied by a poem by Owen Wister delineating a 3-year pursuit of the grizzly in question which has been ravaging cattle herds in the region. The way the sagebrush is suggested rather than delineated indicates Remington's growing debt to Impressionism and the new directions his work was beginning to take.
Created by: Remington, Frederic
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Early in 1893, Remington and his friend John Howard visited the hacienda San Jose de Bavicora, a 900,000 acre cattle ranch just northwest of Chihuahua, Mexico. At that time, the hacienda was owned by Jack Gilbert, whose long struggle with the Apaches in building his land empire was chronicled by Remington in 3 illustrated articles for Harper's Monthly running from December, 1893 to March, 1894. Mexican Cowboys Coming to the Rodeo was an illustration for the last article, "A Rodeo at Los Ojos." Remington described the scene, "My imagination had never pictured before anything so wild as these leather-clad...
Created by: Remington, Frederic
Collection Item
The influence of Impressionism is fully evident in this 1906 oil painting by Remington. Compared to the careful delineation and finish we see in earlier paintings like Arrival of a Courier and Blandy, this work instead uses broad planes of color, negative space, and atmospheric perspective to create the scene. This was more than likely an early oil version, or oil sketch of a larger work which appeared in the October 20, 1906 issue of Collier's Weekly and is currently on display at the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston. Like Calling the Moose, it gives us a hint of...
Created by: Remington, Frederic
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