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Museum: 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Gardens: 7:00 AM - 5:30 PM
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All Items (Remington, Frederic) (Drawings)
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In addition to illustrating stories and articles by other authors, Remington frequently wrote and illustrated his own articles and stories. This is one of two illustrations done for his short story, "A Failure of Justice". The tale concerns Captain Halleran of the Dragoons who witnesses a near triple murder in a combination restaurant-saloon-hotel in the town of Alkali Flat. The quote that names the piece is taken from his description of the captain, which goes on to state: "What sweat and alkali dust won't do to a uniform, sleeping on the ground in it for a month or two will...
Created by: Remington, Frederic
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Illus. on page 34 of Roosevelt's RANCH LIFE AND THE HUNTING TRAIL.
Created by: Remington, Frederic
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Inscribed at bottom by Remington "My dear Doc - I haven't made a drawing in five years and so have no sketches and I can't send you a $40,000 masterpiece you know old chappie. Good luck to you Doc. Don't stop long at Guam.--Yours, Frederic R."
Created by: Remington, Frederic
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Maurice Kingsley wrote an article called "El Cinco de Mayo" for the May 7, 1892 issue of Harper's Weekly and Remington provided 4 illustrations, including this one. While El Cinco de Mayo, or May 5, is not Mexican Independence Day, it is frequently treated as though it were. Mexico actually declared its independence from Spain on September 15, 1810; May 5th celebrates the end of another battle for independence. Early in 1862 French troops landed in Mexico, supposedly to collect debts owed by the government of President Benito Juarez. Emperor Napoleon III used the opportunity to put a Hapsburg prince,...
Created by: Remington, Frederic
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In 1892, a special edition of Francis Parkman's The Oregon Trail, originally published in 1847, was issued with 77 illustrations by Frederic Remington. Parkman's work contained some of the earliest accounts of life on the prairie and in the Rocky Mountains. He tells of riding along Scott's Bluff in Nebraska one morning with traveling companion Henry Chatillon and finding that they were approaching "Old Smoke's lodges". A warrior approached them and, after some communication, escorted them to the camp at Horse Creek. Parkman described his first sight of the chief: On the farther bank stood a large and strong man,...
Created by: Remington, Frederic
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Christmas card framed. This Christmas card drawn by Remington was sent by him to Mr. Ricardo Bertelli, president of the RBW, probably in 1905 (the bronze was copyrighted in May 1906). It depicts Remington and Bertelli standing beside a wax model of the bronze later known as the "Outlaw". Remington says, "Can you cast him?" and Bertelli answers, "Do you think I am one of the Wright Brothers?". At the top is the inscription "Merry Xmas Bartelli from Remington" and on the back is written "To my friend Mr. Graham: R. Bertelli."
Created by: Remington, Frederic
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Little is known about the background of this pastel work. It was probably created by Remington during the time he worked upon a series of eight pastel drawings called Bunch of Buckskins which were published as lithographic prints in 1901. His use of pastel demonstrates Remington's proficiency as a draftsman. Though pastels had been around for centuries (Leonardo da Vinci is often credited as their inventor, though they may predate him), they had achieved fresh popularity in the late 19th century through their use by the Impressionists, particularly Edgar Degas and Mary Cassatt. Pastels themselves consist of pure pigment which...
Created by: Remington, Frederic
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The Rope Corral was one of twelve illustrations done by Remington to accompany the Theodore Roosevelt article, "The Round-Up" in the April, 1888 issue of Century Magazine. Roosevelt wrote this description for the piece: "A rope corral is rigged by stretching a rope from each wheel of one side of the wagon, making a V-shaped space, into which the saddle horses are driven. Certain men stand around to keep them inside, while the others catch the horses: many outfits have one man to do all the roping."
Created by: Remington, Frederic
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Wash drawing.
Created by: Remington, Frederic
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While he was an unabashed supporter of the U.S. Army, even terming the Sand Creek massacre justifiable, Remington, toward the end of his brief life, did develop sympathy for the plight of Native Americans and the loss of their lands and heritage. He wrote a couple of novels and a Broadway play dealing with the story of a half-Indian, half-white protagonist and his difficulty finding a place in the world dominated by white men. While Remington had often portrayed Native Americans as savages and enemies of civilization and made conspicuously racist statements, he nonetheless remained ambivalent about efforts to make...
Created by: Remington, Frederic
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