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All Items (Remington, Frederic)
Collection Item
Weight 264 lbs.
Created by: Remington, Frederic
Collection Item
Demonstrating Remington's mastery of the watercolor medium, this painting was created by use in the December 1894 calendar of the Winchester Repeating Arms Company. Remington created a series of popular prints for the company showing the gun used in various scenarios for a number of years. The Winchester 1873 repeating rifle model was popularly dubbed "the gun that won the West" - more than 750,000 of them were sold. Americans later associated the gun with the West because of its popularity in western-themed movies. John Wayne wielded a Winchester as Rooster Cogburn, it was the firearm chosen by Chuck Connors...
Created by: Remington, Frederic
Collection Item
Perhaps because his father had been a cavalry officer during the Civil War, Remington venerated the U.S. trooper, once writing, "No man earns his wages half so hard as the soldier doing campaign work on the Southwestern frontier . . . " Many of his own trips to the American west were in the company of cavalry troops as they patrolled the Plains and fought a series of Indian Wars. This particular sculpture was one of his last, copyrighted in January of 1909, less than a year before he died. Again, it is an amazing feat of balance, with all...
Created by: Remington, Frederic
Collection Item
While he was an unabashed supporter of the U.S. Army, even terming the Sand Creek massacre justifiable, Remington, toward the end of his brief life, did develop sympathy for the plight of Native Americans and the loss of their lands and heritage. He wrote a couple of novels and a Broadway play dealing with the story of a half-Indian, half-white protagonist and his difficulty finding a place in the world dominated by white men. While Remington had often portrayed Native Americans as savages and enemies of civilization and made conspicuously racist statements, he nonetheless remained ambivalent about efforts to make...
Created by: Remington, Frederic
Collection Item
Since it was unusual for Remington to produce works devoid of action or narrative, this was probably a watercolor sketch designed to create a record of the uniform of cavalry officers at the time of the Mexican War (1846-1848), a sort of military fashion illustration. However, while he did produce illustrations for a book on military uniforms, there is no evidence that this piece was ever used as an illustration for it or any other works. It does demonstrate his continuing fascination with the military and the cavalry in particular, a near obsession probably stemming from his fathers service with...
Created by: Remington, Frederic
Collection Item
As its somewhat stilted quality indicates, this was Remington's first oil painting. According to his cousin Henry M. Sackrider, it was painted in the summer of 1885 in Canton, New York, not long after Remington had returned from his first attempt at a life in the West. He had purchased a sheep ranch in Kansas, but, more interested in being a man of property than actually working with the sheep, he soon lost it and his investment. While his imaginative life took place in the West, the man himself was far more comfortable in New York. The one love in which he was consistent was his love...
Created by: Remington, Frederic
Collection Item
While he collaborated with authors like Owen Wister and Poultney Bigelow, Remington also wrote his own stories and articles. This painting was used to illustrate his short story, "How the Law Got Into the Chaparral" in the December, 1896 Harper''s Monthly. It was written as a tale told to Remington by an old Texas Ranger, Colonel "Rip" Ford. This gouache piece in grisaille concerns an attack Ford led on an Indian village in 1858. As Remington reported Ford''s version: "Pretty soon I got ready and gave the word. We charged. At the river we struck some boggy ground and floundered...
Created by: Remington, Frederic
Collection Item
Scholar Brian Dippie has identified this sculpture, sometimes entitled The Fallen Rider, as based upon an actual incident that Remington witnessed. Angry about being thrown, the cowboy tries to pull the horse to the ground by its ear. Remington explained that the rider did himself no favors; the horse reacted with a lashing kick that was fatal to the cowboy. Sand cast by the Henry-Bonnard Bronze Company, this early piece demonstrates Remington's constant obsession with issues of balance, the horse supported in its throes by only three points of contact at its two front hooves and its nose. Like most...
Created by: Remington, Frederic
Collection Item
Weight 79 3/4 lbs.
Created by: Remington, Frederic
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