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Museum: 10:00 AM - 7:00 PM
Gardens: 7:00 AM - 5:30 PM
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All Items (Remington, Frederic)
Collection Item
Originally planned as an illustration for "General Crook in the Indian Country", an article by Captain John G. Bourke for the March 1891 Century Magazine, this was the first Remington painting to be shown in the annual spring exhibition of the National Academy of Design, marking a sort of official acceptance of Remington by the artistic establishment. It has become one of Remington's best-known pieces and may seem strangely familiar to many viewers. When renowned director John Ford made his 1949 movie, She Wore a Yellow Ribbon, starring John Wayne, he used several of Remington's paintings and sculptures as the...
Created by: Remington, Frederic
Collection Item
The sense of furious action and kinetic tension exhibited in this work are similar to what Remington would soon be bringing to his sculptural pieces. The subject is a young acquaintance of Remington's who was making his own acquaintance with a spirited Western bronco. Born in Brooklyn, New York, Graham F. Blandy went West as a young man, where he became the subject of this portrait of a "greenhorn" cowboy sometime between 1890 and 1900. Soon after, Blandy returned to the East, making his fortune as a prominent New York stockbroker and acquiring a large estate called "The Tuleyries" in...
Created by: Remington, Frederic
Collection Item
Copyright 1895. Cast number in red square underneath. Weight 48 1/4 lbs.
Created by: Remington, Frederic
Collection Item
This was the first and most popular of Remington's sculptures. While he had been supporting himself as a painter and illustrator, Remington had no training as a sculptor when one day a friend suggested that the three-dimensional quality of his drawings suggested a possible affinity for sculpting. Remington bought some clay and the rest, as they say, is history. He produced this sculpture in the summer of 1895; art critic Arthur Hoeber noted in Harper's Weekly that it was quite astonishing that the difficulties of technique in the modeling in clay should have been overcome so readily and with...
Created by: Remington, Frederic
Collection Item
Weight 100 1/4 lbs.
Created by: Remington, Frederic
Collection Item
Having achieved notable success and the financial security that attended it, in 1899 Remington bought a small island on the St. Lawrence River near Ogdensburg, New York in order to build a summer home. He remodeled a small cottage on the island, naming it Ingleneuk, and spent time there painting, writing, and enjoying favorite sports like canoeing, fishing, and swimming. By this time, he had also become friendly with leading American Impressionist Childe Hassam and was searching for new directions in his own art. Aware that critics sometimes faulted his handling of color, he decided to start his new approach...
Created by: Remington, Frederic
Collection Item
In addition to illustrating stories and articles by other authors, Remington frequently wrote and illustrated his own articles and stories. This is one of two illustrations done for his short story, "A Failure of Justice". The tale concerns Captain Halleran of the Dragoons who witnesses a near triple murder in a combination restaurant-saloon-hotel in the town of Alkali Flat. The quote that names the piece is taken from his description of the captain, which goes on to state: "What sweat and alkali dust won't do to a uniform, sleeping on the ground in it for a month or two will...
Created by: Remington, Frederic
Collection Item
Remington made frequent trips to both Mexico and Canada. In this instance, he had traveled to Mexico to gather research for illustrations in an article on the Mexican army by Thomas Janvier. Always fascinated by military uniforms, he prided himself on careful observation and meticulous accuracy in his depiction of them, a pride that sometimes led to uncomfortable altercations with other artists, like the one he initiated with rival Charles Schreyvogel over the latter's portrayal of Custer. Occasioning no such conflict, this Mexican trooper was one of Remingtons early pieces, appearing in the November, 1889 issue of Harper's Monthly.
Created by: Remington, Frederic
Collection Item
Weight 42 1/4 lbs. Stamped "Cire Perdue Cast - Roman Bronze Works, New York"
Created by: Remington, Frederic
Collection Item
This particular bronze is a variant on Remington's original model of The Cheyenne produced in 1901. Remington set out to create an accurate portrait of a Cheyenne warrior, and created an incredible feat of sculptural engineering; the running horse has all four feet off the ground and is supported only by a trailing buffalo robe and clump of grass. Nevertheless, after the first castings of the piece, he felt the shield was awkwardly high and lowered it to the riders waist. He made other minor changes, including the position of the breechcloth over the flanks of the horse and changing...
Created by: Remington, Frederic
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